50 Body Positive Influencers You Should Follow

The women and men who promote appreciation for your body—just the way you are.

Meet the women and men who celebrate self-love in all shapes, sizes, skin colors, body types, and beyond. These body positive influencers lead by example and want to help you become more confident in your own skin, too. So follow them on social media and let their uplifting posts and inspiring projects motivate you to show yourself acceptance today—and every day.

Candice Huffine

Candice Huffine
Candice Huffine 

Magazine cover star Candice Huffine never let anyone stop her from following her dreams—first to become a model and later, a marathon finisher. The creator of @PSYouGotThis, a movement meant to get more people to take up running, and Day/Won, an activewear collection for all sizes, Huffine says body positivity is a journey.

"There is no magic formula or tutorial I can share about how to become confident in your skin, but I have learned from experience it all comes from work,” she tells Verywell. “Be kind. Be patient. Be thankful. Be grateful. Set goals. Challenge your limits. Step outside of your comfort zone. Explore what your body is capable of and prepare to be amazed!"

Jenny Gaither

Jenny Gaither
Jenny Gaither

Wellness coach, dancer, and SoulCycle instructor Jenny Gaither works every day to help build confidence in women everywhere. That’s thanks to her non-profit, Movemeant Foundation (focused on fitness as a way to boost self-worth), and We Dare to Bare, Movemeant’s charity fundraiser promoting body positivity and athletic scholarships.

“I hope to be remembered for making long-term, systemic change in our social system where girls are more revered for their brains and not their beauty; for their boldness and bravery, and not their bodies,” she tells Verywell. “We should celebrate who we are by empowering ourselves, by overcoming challenges, by practicing strength and resilience.”

Jessamyn Stanley

Jessamyn Stanley
Lydia Hudgens Photography

Featured as a body positive advocate across many outlets, yoga instructor and writer Jessamyn Stanley preaches the freedom to embrace yourself in full.

“Body positivity is the only legitimate antidote to our overwhelmingly body negative society,” Stanley tells Verywell. “A woman should revel in her strength and beauty, a strength which literally gives life to the universe... Yoga gives a woman the potential to remember who she actually is—to look within herself for the strength which society actively and willfully seeks to pry from her grasp.”

Ana Alarcon

Ana Alarcon
 Ana Alarcon

Boston-based food blogger, Ana Alarcon, wasn’t always as healthy as she is now. She used to avoid cooking and lived off frozen pizzas, instant noodle soups, and eggs. But she started making meals at home and decided to share her tricks with the world via her blog, Ana Goes Fit.

To her, self-acceptance is all about appreciating your body at every moment: “Body positivity means loving the body you are in—the changes, the size, the color—and take care of it,” she tells Verywell. “Accept that it will change with time. [Self-confidence is] the idea that you can live in your body as it is, and treat it right through nourishment and movement and self-care, without punishing yourself for the way it looks.”

Allie Kieffer

allie Kieffer
Photo by Georgia Nerheim

Professional runner Allie Kieffer scored a personal best in the 2017 New York City Marathon, shaving 26 minutes off her time—and snagging fifth place. After getting slack for her size, Kieffer has become a strong advocate for ignoring the idea that you have to be a certain weight to be a strong runner.

“For a long time I thought a favorable self image was related to leanness, and that I had to have a certain look to be worthy of that kind of self-love,” she tells Verywell. “Now I try to pay it forward by showing others that you can be confident in your own skin even if you stand out. Love yourself for the things your body does for you instead of the way it looks.”

Zach Miko

Zach Miko
 IMG Models

Men carry a body positive message too, and Zach Miko does it with a smile. The first brawn model for IMG Models, he tells Verywell that confidence means focusing on the present.

“To me body positivity is learning to love and respect who you are right now,” he says. “Not tomorrow, not after a diet, or a workout plan, or losing or gaining 50 pounds. It’s loving your body right now in the very moment because right now your body is beautiful, it is amazing, and it is you. Love every muscle, every roll, every curve.”

Dana Falsetti

Dana Falsetti
 Photo by Michele Suits

 Yoga instructor Dana Falsetti prefers to call the confidence movement “body justice” instead of body positivity.

“It’s not only about self-love and self-care, but it’s about the ways in which people in marginalized bodies are viewed and oppressed,” she tells Verywell. “It isn't only a space to talk about confidence, but also to engage in difficult discussion about the social and political climates that impact us. Confidence and assuredness of self gives us the tools we need to keep on keeping on, to live life as fully as we can, and recognize all we have to offer.”

Alicia Keys

Alicia Keys
C Flanagan/FilmMagic/Getty

Grammy Award-winning singer Alicia Keys’ body positive message reads all over her face. She started a makeup-free movement in 2016, when she stopped wearing any cosmetics for her public appearances. And it definitely made an impact, garnering tons of media attention. If her song lyrics don’t inspire you to rise up and be proud of who you are, simply follow her IG where she often posts uplifting messages, like this one:

“We are a gorgeous, infinite circle of women of all shades, all styles, in all the ways we were made,” she writes. “Inside of us everything blooms.”

Em Ford

Em Ford
Em Ford

Londoner Em Ford started blogging in 2014, and after developing adult acne about a year later, she began posting makeup tutorials (along with makeup-free photos) on social media and on YouTube under her same blog name, My Pale Skin.

Her video, “You Look Disgusting,” which shares the negative comments she received on her photos, garnered 27 million views and more than 92,000 comments. Her send-off message? “You look beautiful. Don’t let anyone tell you different. Even yourself.”

Täo Porchon-Lynch

Täo Porchon-Lynch
Täo Porchon-Lynch

Täo Porchon-Lynch is living proof that age is just a number. At 99 years old, she holds a few pretty inspiring records, including being the oldest yoga teacher (she practices every day) and the oldest ballroom dancer (she just started competing in dance at age 87).

She has many positive words of wisdom she lives by, but our favorite might just be this daily mantra: “This is going to be the best day of my life.”

Tatyana McFadden

Tatyana McFadden
Mike Hewitt/Staff/Getty

Tatyana McFadden has snagged 17 medals (seven gold!) throughout her career as a Paralympic athlete in wheelchair track and field. Plus, she won the 2018 Boston Marathon. But it’s her dedication to helping other athletes with disabilities that makes her stand out on the scoreboard.

Born with spina bifida, she wanted to race with her high school track mates. Her lawsuit to earn that right led to a disabilities act in Maryland that now requires schools to allow students with disabilities to compete in interscholastic athletics.

“Having positive body image isn’t always easy, but our bodies have lead us to where we are today!” she posted on Twitter. “Remember you come with one body…love it will all of your heart.”

Lindsey Clayton and Amber Rees

Lindsay Clayton and Amber Rees
Lindsay Clayton and Amber Rees/Instagram

Fit influencers and founders of the Brave Body Project, Lindsey Clayton and Amber Rees wanted to bring solid workouts with a realistic exercise approach to the masses. They believe in the balance between smoothies, sweat, pizza, and even booze. They spread confidence to everyone they come across, particularly through physical activity and being thankful for a body that can move.

Their first priority for working out isn’t about sculpting a slim, toned body, but to feel good. Just take it from this post on Clayton’s IG: “Work out for the right reasons. Work out because you want to be the best version of you. Work out because it's fun. The results will follow, I promise.”

Michelle Elman

Michelle Elman
Michelle Elman

As a body confidence coach, Michelle Elman knows all about ways to raise self-esteem. She often posts messages and facts on fat on her Instagram page, @scarrednotscared to inspire others.

“The fear of fat not only drives body image issues, but a disordered relationship with eating that can lead to broader psychological consequences,” she tells Verywell. “My aim is to help people realize that their body is good enough right now, and it’s important that they start living their life right now.”

Amy Purdy

Amy Purdy
Matthew Stockman/Getty Images Sport

After getting bacterial meningitis, Amy Purdy lost both her legs at age 19. But that never stopped her from taking big steps forward. The Paralympic snowboarder, author of On My Own Two Feet and Dancing with the Stars contestant, has won two Paralympic medals (bronze and silver).

“Life is all about perspective. I’m living the life I always dreamed of, just in a completely different way than I ever imagined,” she writes on IG. “We have to be willing to let go of what we thought our lives would look like & embrace what they are & that’s when we begin to see the endless possibilities!”

Keah Brown

Keah Brown
Photo by Linda Striggo 

Keah Brown, a writer and soon-to-be book author, has penned several essays about her cerebral palsy and the mental battle that sometimes comes with her condition. But she always finds a silver lining, a few of which she features with #disabledandcute.

“Body positivity means that I embrace every bump, scar, and bruise I have even when it feels impossible,” she tells Verywell. “It means celebrating every other body too—bodies of color, disabled bodies, non-binary bodies, LGBTQ+ bodies, and not just the bodies with a little chub that are still acceptable. Body positivity means celebration in the face of a world that doesn’t recognize the beauty in bodies like mine.”

Alissa Rumsey, RD

Alissa Rumsey
 Photo Credit: Alissa Rumsey

Registered dietitian and intuitive eating coach, Alissa Rumsey believes eating shouldn’t be about what you can’t have, but what you can. And she encourages clients to simply listen to their bodies.

“We live in a crazy culture where it's seen as normal to diet, to dislike our bodies, and to constantly be trying to change them,” she says. “I'm passionate about helping people make peace with their bodies so that they can stop postponing their lives ‘until I lose weight’ and be happy with their body just as it is today.”

Bruce Sturgell

Bruce Sturgell
Bruce Sturgell

After countless trips to the mall left him empty handed thanks to the lack of sizes, Bruce Sturgell decided to start Chubstr, a site that features style finds for plus-size men. To him, body positivity is simply about loving yourself.

“Your size is just a part of what makes you who you are,” he tells Verywell. “You’re amazing just as you are! Don’t let anyone make you feel like less because you’re not the ‘right’ size for them.”

Kathryn Budig

Kathryn Budig
Photo by Leo Lo

This yoga instructor has a full resume, including podcaster for Free Cookers, author of Aim True, recipe writer, and teacher for Yoga Glo. But something else she should add: self-love advocate. In a recent Instagram post, she wrote a letter to her younger self about realizing her own beauty.

“Cherish what your body does for you and [ignore] the projections of others and that judgemental [sic] voice in your head,” she writes. “You look damn strong, girl, but skin and size doesn’t equate beauty.”

Kelly Clarkson

Kelly Clarkon
Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic/Getty 

Singer, songwriter, and Grammy winner, Kelly Clarkson is no stranger to comments about her body. She’s had to deal with criticism since she first appeared on American Idol. But she’s learned to rise above negativity, stay confident, and concentrate not on her looks, but her happiness.

“If you gauge your life on what other people think, you’re going to be in a constant state of panic trying to please everyone,” she said in one interview. “People should just concentrate on their own lives and their own health and their own happiness, and whatever that looks like for you, be happy with it.”

Olakemi Obi

Olakemi Obi
 Olakemi Obi

Founder of the Plus Is Diverse Campaign, Olakemi fights for representation of different races in the plus-size community, to help promote diversity of all kinds.

“To achieve full body confidence, one must first build mind confidence,” Olakemi tells Verywell. “We have to start loving every bit of ourselves, regardless of whether we like it or not.

Jess Weiner

Jess Weiner
 Stefanie Keenan/Getty

Jess Weiner has been helping change beauty standards, one effective campaign at a time. She helped launch Dove’s Campaign for Real Beauty, as well as the new, more diverse Barbie that celebrates more sizes, shapes, heights, hair colors, and more. She’s a firm believer that the journey to self-confidence is not an overnight switch, and says self-care involves eliminating negative self-talk.

“Don’t allow nagging self-doubt to zap you of your power or agency,” she writes on her blog. “Quiet the negative talk so you can focus on positive change.”

Allison Kimmey

Allison Kimmey
Allison Kimmey

In addition to producing an ebook on confidence and sharing positive social media posts, Allison Kimmey is also the founder of the non-profit Girlphoria, created to empower young women.

“I spent decades believing that I was the only one that dealt with the shame of living in a larger body,” she says to Verywell. “When I found body positivity, it was the first moment I felt like I could identify with others that looked like me. To me, body positivity gives those living in marginalized bodies an opportunity to see that they are not alone, and to encourage them to take up space and to step into who they truly are.”

Tamara Pridgett

Tamara Pridgett
Tamara Pridgett/IG

Trainer, fitness model, and editor Tamara Pridgett is real. She exudes confidence in both the way she carries herself and the way presents herself. She speaks her mind and she knows who she is, and that makes her one to follow.

“Am I the only one who gets told how intimidating they are on a weekly basis?! I've heard this MY ENTIRE LIFE and I just don't see it. I've been told that it's everything from the way I walk, how I speak, to my commanding presence,” she writes in one post. “What I do see is someone who is 5'4" but has a personality that makes them seem 6'0" tall. Someone who's direct. Smart. Opinionated. Goofy. Slightly awkward. Determined. Ambitious. And most importantly, someone who's confident with who they are. So if that intimidates you, I'm not sorry."

Shay Neary

Shay Neary
Ellie Martin/Instagram

Shay Neary was the first transgender plus-size model to land a major fashion campaign for Coverstory. On the @watchshayslay Instagram feed, you’ll find tons of inspirational messages with deep insight into Shay’s thoughts about body image and finding the positive light even on dark days.

One of our favorite reads: “My body and mind aren’t dividable. All the parts that make me, the person I am today, are cumulative. They are layers of work, time, abuse, self-awareness, body image issues, self-love, and insecurity. Each a lesson...ever growing always."

Ryan Sheldon

Ryan Sheldon
Ryan Sheldon

Blogger, brawn model, and founder of Confessions of a Binge Eater, Ryan Sheldon openly talks about his binge eating disorder and how it has affected his life. His goal is to take the stigma away to help others heal—his secret to more self-confidence, too.

“To me body image is three things—the way we feel physically in our bodies, the way we view our bodies when looking in the mirror, and the way we think others perceive our bodies,” he tells Verywell. “Body image is something that truly affects everyone in different ways and being able to speak publicly about it has been part of my healing process… We all have the potential to change someone else's life just by sharing our story.”

Ashley Graham

Ashley Graham
 D Dipasupil/Getty

Ashley Graham, the first size-16 model to land on the cover of Sports Illustrated, is always up for discussing how to build confidence and celebrating diversity in women. She’s never afraid to stand up to haters who comment on her weight, humbly responds to women who say she’s an inspiration, and often showcases her serious gym moves.

Her latest campaign for Swimsuits for All promotes unedited photos and encourages women of all shapes and sizes to get into a suit—and feel confident doing it.

Rebecca Scritchfield, RD

Rebecca Scritchfield, RD
Rebecca Scritchfield, RD

Rebecca Scritchfield doesn’t believe in dieting. Instead, this dietitian is all about creating healthy habits, enjoying life, and just being kind to your body—which is why she wrote Body Kindness.

“I believe we are all inherently worthy just for being born,” she tells Verywell. “Body positivity means living the value of respecting all bodies, no matter what they look like or what they can do. Everyone deserves to feel a positive connection with their body.”

Stephanie Yeboah

Stephanie Yeboah
 Kaye Ford @fordtography

Stephanie Yeboah started Nerd About Town as a beauty blog. Though her first love was fashion, she initially lacked the self-confidence to post about her own style. Today she regularly shares style posts, and how she picks herself up from self-confidence slumps. In one post she says one thing she’s learned is that her body is not the enemy.

“Even when I’m not feeling fantastic, I can come back to knowing that my body is working with me, not against me,” she writes. “It’s my best ally in living my fullest in celebration of radical self-love.”

Rachel Spencer

Rachel Spencer
 Rachel Spencer/Instagram

Growing up, Rachel Spencer dealt with body image issues, always comparing herself to others and having a strong desire to be someone else. But when she found a body positive community on Instagram, it turned her life around. Now she’s a life coach, passing that confidence on to others.

“Confidence isn’t a switch in your brain that you can turn on and off,” she shares. “No one is born without insecurities and no one makes the decision to love themselves without an uphill battle. Healing isn’t linear. So as your body begins to change, just remind yourself to let go.”

Harnaam Kaur

Harnaam Kaur
 Harnaam Kaur/Instagram

Harnaam Kaur is no stranger to bullying—she has experienced it since grade school. With polycystic ovarian syndrome causing an imbalance of hormones that led to her growing a full beard, Kaur decided to embrace her body and her beard at age 16. Since then, she’s become a strong voice on self-acceptance.

She gives talks throughout the world on self-esteem and embracing your uniqueness—and every word she says is one to hold on to. Just check out her TED Talk to hear for yourself.

Bo Stanley

Bo Stanley
Bo Stanley/Instagram

You might recognize Bo Stanley from her time on The Bachelor in 2015, but she’s making plenty of waves elsewhere. The model and pro surfer, who found strength on her board, celebrates women of all sizes. Her entire Instagram account is filled with messages about body positivity and embracing diversity in bodies, especially in the surfing industry.

“To me, body positivity means loving and honoring your body wherever it may be in this very moment,” Stanley tells Verywell. “It is so important to showcase a diverse set of bodies in the media so that young women grow up seeing a body type they can relate to, which will imprint a positive body image and self-confidence. [We need] to teach women to strive to be strong and healthy by their OWN genetic standards—that means we will all look different, and that’s a beautiful thing!”

Lita Lewis

Lita Lewis
Photo by Osato Erebor @osatoerebor 

Trainer and wellness retreat host, Lita Lewis believes that “femininity and sexiness” can also mean “tough, bold and durable.” She wants all women to accept their bodies, whether that means curvy or slim. She even created a clothing line, Thick Athletics, to help people embrace that. Some of her signature shirts includes cheeky messages like “Love Thigh Self” and “I Love It When You Call Me Thick Mama.”

Throughout her social posts, you can find words of body-loving inspo, like “Seriously, just stop allowing negative opinions to penetrate your consciousness. It’s so much easier to ignore shade when you choose to care more about how YOU feel about yourself -vs- how others feel towards you."

Kate Speer

Kate Speer
Kate Speer/Instagram

Better known as Positively Kate, blogger Kate Speer underwent shock therapy in college to treat her misdiagnosed bipolar disorder. She lost two years of her memory from it, and worked through therapy to get back to a healthy mental state. Candid in her battle with depression, Kate is also open about her struggles with body image. One of her Instagram posts went viral when she shared her #jiggleforjoy.

“My body is MORE than its appearance,” she writes. “My body is NOT my value. My body is simply the vessel for my fabulous self… MY BODY—IN ITS ENTIRETY—IS WORTHY OF LOVE.”

Demi Lovato

Demi Lovato
Theo Wargo/Getty Images Entertainment

You can always count on “Sorry Not Sorry” singer Demi Lovato to tell it how it is, even if that means being vulnerable. She's willing to share her struggles with body image and disordered eating and showing the real side of learning to love yourself, all while living in the spotlight. 

“I’m insecure about my legs in this picture,” she wrote on one inspiring Instagram post. “But I’m posting it because I look so happy and this year I’ve decided I’m letting go of my perfectionism and embracing freedom from self-criticism. Learning to love my body the way it is is challenging but life-changing."

Cece Olisa

Cece Olisa
 Cece Olisa/Instagram

Cece Olisa’s motto sums up her attitude: “Don’t wait on weight to live the life you want.”

The blogger turned entrepreneur started a body positive convention for curvy girls, timed with New York Fashion Week to discuss fashion, beauty and of course, positivity. Her blog and YouTube channel also share fitness, dating and fashion tips, and advice “from a plus-size perspective.”

Chris Mosier

Chris Mosier
Chris Mosier

Duathlete and triathlete Chris Mosier has active written all over him. He’s also earned recognition for being the first transgender athlete to make a men’s U.S. National Team, to be featured in ESPN The Magazine’s The Body Issue, and to receive a Nike sponsorship.

“As an athlete, my body is my tool and my vehicle for achieving my dreams,” Mosier tells Verywell. “There's no one right way to have a body, or to be an athlete, or to be a transgender person. Once we stop worrying about what others will think of us or say about us, the whole entire world opens up.”

Ana Rojas Bastidas

Ana Rojas Bastidas
 Ana Rojas Bastidas, Power to Prevail

Mom and creator of the blog PowerToPrevail, Ana Rojas Bastidas found confidence in movement. Getting to the finish of a 5K, 10K, half marathon, and triathlon helped strengthen her career successes and personal relationships. But she knew she had to address her body concerns, and she learned to accept herself—which made her feel free.

“Body positivity means being free to be me. It's important because in a world with 7 billion people it's easy to feel as though it's our job to please everyone when really there's only one person who can make memories for you—and that's you,” she tells Verywell.

Amrita Hepi

Amrita Hepi
Amrita Hepi/Instagram

No one follows the idea of dancing like nobody's watching more than Australian pro dancer and choreographer, Amrita Hepi. She even gave a TedxYouth talk titled “To Be a Good Dancer, Don’t Give a F***.” In her speech, she says dance is about separating yourself from the gaze of others and just enjoying your body.

“Commit to your movement,” she says. “There’s nothing to lose from movement.”

Danielle Brooks

Danielle Brooks
Adela Loconte/WireImage/Getty 

When she’s not starring as Taystee on Orange Is the New Black, Danielle Brooks often posts about self-confidence and her self-esteem struggles and triumphs on Instagram and loves to talk about self-confidence—she even spoke about beauty in all shapes and sizes at New York’s Beauty Con Festival.

One example of her social media inspiration to look beyond aesthetics for self-fulfillment came after she finished a Spartan Race: “My first @SpartanRace thank you to my amazing trainer for showing me their are more rewarding goals in life than chasing a number on a scale."

Ash Soto

Ash Soto
Ash Soto/Instagram

Ash Soto, also known as @radiantbambi and “the girl with the world painted on her body,” always shares words of uplifting wisdom on her Instagram page.

“We tend to look for the approval of others to feel content or to feel good about ourselves," she writes. "It's so important to not feed your self-doubt with thoughts that aren't healthy and will make you feel like you aren't enough, don't question your self-worth EVER.”

Tess Holliday

Tess Holliday
Cindy Ord/Getty 

You can’t have a body positive influencer list without the woman behind @effyourbeautystandards, a movement meant to defy the beauty boundaries and provide a safe space to share struggles and triumphs.

Tess Holliday is aiming to change the way media portrays women and beauty, and with that comes her part in the documentary, Straight/Curve: Redefining Body Image. Produced to help change how media represent women and the ideal look, this film is meant to lift women up, instead of making them feel less-than.

Milly Smith

Milly Smith
Milly Smith/Instagram 

Founder of @selfloveclubb, Milly Smith offers insight into what she looks and feels like behind the screen. She explains that, like most areas of life, there are ebbs and flows in her body positivity and she’s learned to accept that.

“Some days I am feeling my damn self, parading around in lingerie, snapping pics of my bootay,” she writes. “Other days I’m avoiding mirrors at all costs, I’m hiding my body the best I can…realizing that like every journey in life there will be ups and downs, has really given me some relief, some closure, and some acceptance.”

Sarah Sapora

Sarah Sapora
Sarah Sapora/Instagram

Sapora is the founder of the Body + Love Workshops, a weekend of meditation, discussion, and cultivating a positive mindset.

“I fully believe that life-long change can only come from a place of self-love,” she tells Verywell. “Not shame, not fear, not self-judgment. Just love. If we want to learn to honor our body and to create a happier and healthier life (whatever that looks like for us) from the inside out, we have to learn to love ourselves as we are first!”

Iskra Lawrence

Iskra Lawrence
Mike Windle/Getty

As an AerieREAL model, Iskra Lawrence shares real talk on her social pages, promoting self-love and body acceptance. In one post, she reveals her struggles in fashion and how she’s risen above the scrutiny. She's starting a new docu-series on Facebook Watch, dubbed “The Mirror Challenge.” It’s meant to show how people view themselves, and how to make it a positive perspective.

“I thought if I looked like ‘her’ (an unrealistic beauty ideal), I’d be happy, successful and loved.” she says on Instagram. “All I found was failure (because you can’t change who you are), emptiness (because my time and energy was being used up trying to achieve something completely self-absorbed and shallow sacrificing doing things I loved) and unhappiness (because no restrictive diet or abusive exercise feels good)”.

Kenzie Brenna

Kenzie Brenna
Kenzie Brenna/Instagram 

The woman behind #CelluliteSaturday, Kenzie Brenna has a feed filled with candid images and even more intimate captions. She often shares her negative thoughts about her body and then how she addresses them and flips them into a more positive view.

“You don't have to be in love with yourself everyday, but I PROMISE if you practice self-love you will have more loving moments with yourself than you could ever dream of,” she says in one post about stretch marks.

Gina Susanna

Gina Susanna
Gina Susanna/ Instagram

Gina Susanna of @nourishandeat is a recovered anorexic, orthoexic, and excessive exerciser. She learned to love her body and now helps to spread that acceptance, via her online presence, to others who might be suffering. She believes “life is too short to spend it at war with your body.”

“Seeing the way my body folds like gentle hands in conversation—patiently; respectfully; is my recovery win,” she writes on Instagram. “Because I chose it. Even when I didn’t think it was an option, I chose it.”

Megan Jayne Crabbe

Megan Jayne Crabbe
Megan Jayne Crabbe/Instagram

Megan Jayne Crabbe, of @bodyposipanda, blogs about body confidence, intuitive eating, fatphobia and more—she even wrote a book, called Body Positive Power, about it all. You’ll find inspiring quotes on her Instagram feed, plus insights into her self-love mindset, especially after an eating disorder.

“Something I realized last year is that I've spent the majority of my life giving other people the power to define me, rather than taking that power for myself,” she writes in one post. “I'll probably spend a lifetime unlearning the idea that how I see myself is in everyone's hands except my own. But I think it'll be worth it.”

Amy Poehler

Amy Poehler
Pascal Le Segretain/WireImage/Getty

You probably know Amy Poehler for providing big laughs on film and TV, but she also has some pretty powerful (and a little more serious) messages about body image—and embracing your weird. With her organization, Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls, and web series, “Smart Girls at the Party,” she offers confidence tips to young women.

“Go around your body and kind of thank it for what it gives you and thank yourself for your great eyesight, or your thick hair, or your nice legs, or your strong teeth, or whatever it is that you have that you were given,” she says in one video. “And make friends with those parts of your body and not try to focus on the parts that will never change.”

Nicole Groman, RD

Nicole Groman
Nicole Groman

Non-diet dietitian Nicole Groman encourages you to listen to your body and honor your cravings—not deprive it of what it wants. She even created a clothing line signifying just that, called Body Over Mind Apparel.

“I believe that body positivity comes from treating your body with respect by honoring hunger, fullness, and cravings, as opposed to punishing it with a diet or restrictive eating,” she tells Verywell. “It's so crucial to promote body confidence because there are so many voices out there (extreme diets, juice cleanses, weight loss supplements) telling us that there is something wrong with our bodies the way they are and we need fixing.”

Margot Meanie

Margot Meanie
Margot Meanie/Instagram

Margot Meanie loves fashion and expresses her style in every post on Instagram. She’s also the creator of @alternativecurves and #alternativecurves, which she dubs as “a place to celebrate diverse alternative, quirky, goth and non-mainstream plus-size fashion.” Margot is a self-proclaimed activist, but doesn’t always use words to fight for her cause.

“To me, dressing my fat body can be an act of rebellion,” she says on her site. “Letting others see a woman comfortable wearing what she likes in the body she currently has I believe can instill confidence in others.”