How to Make New Couple Friends

Couple friends having coffee together.

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Making friends as a couple can be difficult, but it's so worth it. Having friends that are in the same stage of life as you are is incredibly important. It's a great way to have built-in support and fun people to do things with.

Deciding that you want to have couple friends is only the first step, however. The next step is finding them. While individual friends are easy enough to find, couple friends can be a little more difficult. This is because you not only have to find someone that you get along with, but you also have to find someone that your partner gets along with.

That being said, having couple friends can be a rewarding and fun experience. If it doesn't happen for you right away, don't worry! Keep trying and eventually, you'll find the perfect fit.

Why Is it So Hard to Find Couple Friends?

It can be tough to find other couples to befriend because everyone is different. You and your partner may have different interests, backgrounds, or lifestyles. And it can be difficult to find time to socialize when you both have busy lives.

If you're having trouble making couple friends, check if it might be for one of these reasons:

  1. You and your partner may have different interests. This can make it difficult to find activities that you both enjoy.
  2. You may not know where to start. It can be tough to figure out how to meet new people, especially if you're not used to socializing.
  3. You may be shy or introverted. It can be difficult to put yourself out there and meet new people if you're not comfortable with social situations.
  4. Your schedules may be different. If you and your partner have different work schedules or other commitments, it can be tough to find time to socialize.
  5. You may live in a small town or rural area. This can make it difficult to find other couples who share your interests.

Where Do Couples Meet New Friends?

Couples meet new friends in a variety of ways. Whether you meet new couple friends online, through mutual friends, or at local events, there are plenty of ways to connect with other couples. Here are some of the most common:

  1. Through mutual friends or acquaintances. If you already have one or more couple friends, they may be able to introduce you to other couples.
  2. At social events or gatherings. This can include parties, weddings, and other functions.
  3. Through work or school. You may meet other couples through your job or through classes you're taking.
  4. Online. There are a number of online communities and websites specifically for couples to meet new friends.
  5. In your neighborhood or town. If you live in a small town or suburb, you may be able to find other couple friends by hanging out in your local park or by attending community events.

How to Make New Couple Friends

Now that you know where to find other couples, how can you make friends with them? It's not enough to show up and hope that you click. You need to put in some effort to get to know them and build a relationship. Here are a few tips:

  1. Attend activities that you enjoy. This is the best way to ensure that you have something in common with other couples.
  2. Talk to other couples. Don't be afraid to introduce yourself and start a conversation. While it may be tempting to try and make friends with popular people, research shows that those with fewer connections may have more time to invest in a friendship with you.
  3. Get together outside of social events. This can include going on double dates, taking a weekend trip together, or just hanging out at each other's houses.
  4. Be respectful of each other's time and space. Don't overstay your welcome or invade the other couple's personal space.
  5. Be open to new experiences. If the other couple wants to try something that you're not familiar with, give it a try. You may be surprised at how much you enjoy it.
  6. Schedule time for socialization. If you and your partner are busy, make a point to schedule regular dates or outings with other couples.
  7. Don't be afraid to be yourself. The best friendships are the ones where you can be yourself and not worry about what the other person is thinking.

How to Make Friends as a Couple in a New City

Moving to a new city can be exciting, but it can also be daunting. It can be difficult to make friends in a new place, especially if you don't know anyone. But there are a few things you can do to ease the transition and make new friends:

  1. Join social media groups or forums related to your interests. This is a great way to connect with people who share your hobbies and interests. One study found that having a large number of online friends or frequent interactions online can increase feelings of social support.
  2. Try an app. There are a number of apps designed for making friends, like Bumble BFF or Hey! Vina.
  3. Attend community events. There are often events happening in your community that you can attend. This is a great way to meet new people and get involved in your new town.
  4. Join a club or group. This can be anything from a book club to a cooking class. Doing something together will help you bond and give you something in common to chat about.
  5. Get involved in your community. There are often events happening that you can attend, or you can volunteer for a cause you care about. This is a great way to make friends and do good at the same time.

Do Married Couples Need Friends?

Research has shown that the quality and intensity of friendships outside of an individual's immediate family are positively associated with life satisfaction.

Friends can provide emotional support, a listening ear, and a different perspective on problems. They can also help keep marriages healthy by providing social and recreational activities that couples can enjoy together.

However, it's important to remember that you and your spouse are ultimately responsible for your own happiness. You don't need friends to have a happy marriage, but having friends can certainly add to the enjoyment of married life.

Is It Bad If a Married Couple Has No Couple Friends?

If you and your partner don't have any couple friends, it's not necessarily a bad thing. It just means that you'll need to find other ways to connect with each other and spend time together. There are plenty of activities that you can do as a couple, even if you don't have any friends in common.

Ultimately, the most important thing is that you and your partner have a strong relationship with each other.

What If My Partner Doesn't Want to Make New Friends?

If your partner is resistant to the idea of making new friends, try to find out why. They may be shy or introverted, or they may simply not know how to go about it.

Talk about your own reasons for wanting to make friends, and see if you can come up with a plan that works for both of you.

You may need to be patient and take things slowly. But if you're both committed to the idea, it's definitely possible to make new friends as a couple.

A Word From Verywell

Making friends as a couple can be a great way to connect with other couples and expand your social circles. However, it's important to remember that you don't need friends to have a happy marriage. If you and your partner are content spending time alone together, that's perfectly fine. The most important thing is that you have a strong relationship with each other.

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3 Sources
Verywell Mind uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
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