'I Don't Care About Anything': Why You Might Feel This Way

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Do you feel like you've lost interest in things you used to care about? This can happen from time to time for anyone, and the feeling usually passes with time. But if you find yourself persistently thinking "I don't care about anything," then it can be a sign that something in your life needs to change or that you are experiencing a mental health condition.

This article discusses some of the signs that you’ve stopped caring and what causes this type of feeling. It also covers some of the strategies that may help you feel more interested and engaged in the world around you.

What Does It Mean Not to Care About Anything?

Are you tired of feeling like you don't care about anything? This feeling can be a sign of clinical depression and other mental health conditions. 

Although it might seem like something you can handle on your own, the truth is that not caring about things can cause problems in relationships, make it difficult to achieve goals, and affect multiple areas of your life including work, school, and daily functioning.  

If you don't care about anything, then you may lack the motivation to pursue your goals. For example, if you don't care about school or your future, then why even bother going? Or, if you don't care about what others think of you, then you might begin making impulsive decisions that don't line up with who you really are.

It can be completely normal to feel this way from time to time. Life is full of ups and downs, and everyone experiences down periods where they don't feel motivated to do things that they normally enjoy doing.

The key difference between feeling temporarily unmotivated and a more serious problem is how long it lasts and how severely the feeling affects your mood and behavior.

Recap

Not caring about anything can have a serious impact on your life. It can make it hard to reach your goals or may cause you to do things that don't reflect your values or expectations.

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Signs of Not Caring About Anything

Some of the key signs that you are feeling that you don't care about anything include:

  • You don't find pleasure or enjoyment in the things that you normally love doing
  • You've lost interest in your friendships and other relationships and have withdrawn socially
  • You've stopped engaging in hobbies and other interests
  • Your libido has decreased and you feel a lack of interest in sex and other forms of physical intimacy
  • You have a difficult time expressing emotions
  • You often feel that you'd prefer to just be alone
  • You procrastinate and have a hard time getting started on tasks because you just don't care
  • You've dropped out of activities or events that you normally participate in because you have no motivation
  • Things you used to be passionate about seem unimportant or trivial
  • Your thoughts tend to be negative and pessimistic
  • You don't take actions that you need to take such as making phone calls or going to appointments

If these feelings are not just happening from time to time, are persistent, accompanied by significant anxiety, or you have the feeling that you've fallen into a malaise or funk that you just can't break free from—they might reflect a clinical depression or other mental health condition that warrants treatment.

Recap

Not caring about things can affect your work, relationships, energy levels, emotional expression, and daily pursuits.

What Causes People to Stop Caring?

Feeling as if you don’t care about anything anymore may be related to anhedonia or apathy. 

  • Anhedonia is a mental state in which people have an inability to feel pleasure. It is often a symptom of mental health conditions such as depression, bipolar disorder, and substance use.
  • Apathy is a feeling of indifference marked by a lack of concern, interest, or enthusiasm. It can be normal at times, but it can also be a sign of a mental health condition when it is excessive and affects a person's ability to function normally in daily life.

Research has found that people who experience more apathy are also more likely to report more feelings of anhedonia, suggesting the two are closely connected.

While everyone experiences varying degrees of such feelings from time to time, excessive feelings of apathy and anhedonia are often a sign of a deeper problem. Some conditions that may cause people to experience persistent and disruptive feelings of not caring about anything include:

Anhedonia is one of the hallmark symptoms of depression. If you feel that you don't care about anything and struggle to feel pleasure or interest, you should talk to your healthcare provider about what you are experiencing.

Chronic stress and traumatic events can also play a part in causing feelings of disinterest. Challenging world events in recent years such as the COVID-19 pandemic, economic disruptions, and political unrest, for example, may contribute to feelings of anhedonia and apathy in many people. The feeling that has been associated with the pandemic has been dubbed languishing and is characterized by feelings of numbness, a lack of interest, and poor motivation.

Research indicates that apathetic feelings tend to be quite common; studies suggest as many as 10 million adults in the U.S. are affected by such feelings.

Recap

Stress, certain medical conditions, and some mental health conditions can play a role in causing people to not care about anything. 

Treatments That Can Help

If your inability to feel interested and concerned is affecting your ability to deal with your daily life, it is important to take steps to address the problem. And if these feelings are accompanied by other mental health symptoms such as sadness, hopelessness, irritability, changes in appetite, problems sleeping, or anxiety, talk to a healthcare provider.

A healthcare professional can evaluate your symptoms and determine if there is an underlying medical or mental health condition that might be contributing to what you are experiencing. The treatment that they recommend will depend on your diagnosis but may involve medication, psychotherapy, or a combination of the two. 

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a type of therapy that focuses on helping people learn to identify underlying negative thought patterns that contribute to mental health problems. Once people learn to recognize these thoughts, they can work with a therapist to develop more positive ways of thinking.

How to Begin Caring Again

If you’re struggling with feelings of apathy, disinterest, and lack of pleasure, seeking professional treatment should be your first step. In addition to working with a doctor or therapist, you can also take steps on your own to improve your mood and take a greater interest in the world around you.

Consider the Causes

Think about recent events in your life that might be contributing to what you are feeling. Have you been coping with a great deal of stress lately? Did you experience some type of disappointment or setback in your personal or professional life?

Figuring out some of the reasons why you might be feeling this sense of indifference can help you figure out what steps you might need to take next.

Vary Your Routine

Getting stuck in a rut can often lead to losing interest. When your daily routine and normal tasks start to feel like they are grinding you down, look for ways to switch things up. 

Strategies that might help include trying new things, talking to different people, or making plans with a friend. Practicing gratitude can also be a great way to notice, appreciate, and take an interest in the great things in your life.

Take Care of Yourself

Feeling like you don’t care about anything often extends to not caring about yourself either. But a poor diet, lack of sleep, limited exercise, and other unhealthy habits can make feelings of apathy and lethargy even worse. Prioritize self-care and spend time each day making sure that you have what you need to feel healthy and well. 

Try Small Steps

Big projects often feel overwhelming when you are struggling with a lack of motivation and interest. Focus on breaking up projects into smaller steps so that you can tackle them a little bit of time. 

Research suggests that people who are prone to apathy have a much more difficult time initiating behavior. This inability to get started can then contribute to even more feelings of apathy because the situation seems overwhelming or unchangeable. 

Focusing on smaller, more manageable steps may help address this problem. You might not have the energy to take on the entire project all at once, but making a little progress each day can help you stay on track and may eventually help you feel more motivated and accomplished. 

Practice Mindfulness

Worrying about the past and the future can create stress and even a sense of hopelessness if you feel like nothing you do will make any difference in how things turn out. Mindfulness can help you focus more on the present. 

Instead of being consumed by thoughts about things you can’t change and a future you can’t predict, your energy is better spent focusing on the things you can do in the present moment to help yourself feel better.

Find Support

Talking to a friend or loved one may also be helpful. Social support is critical for mental well-being. You may find that having people who can offer validation and encouragement can help you feel more inspired and interested. 

Recap

There are things you can do to care more. Treating underlying causes, getting out of a rut, caring for yourself, and getting support are just a few steps you can take that may make a difference.

A Word From Verywell

It isn't uncommon to feel like you don't care about anything from time to time. Such moods may often result from feeling unmotivated or stuck in a rut.

In other cases, however, losing your interest in everything and everyone in your life can be a sign of a mental health condition such as depression. If your symptoms last longer than two weeks and are affecting your ability to function normally, you should talk to your healthcare provider or a mental health professional about what you are experiencing.

Some problems like depression can gradually grow worse over time, especially if they are left untreated. Getting the help you need now can help you start feeling better sooner.

If you or a loved one are struggling with depression, contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Helpline at 1-800-662-4357 for information on support and treatment facilities in your area.

For more mental health resources, see our National Helpline Database.

6 Sources
Verywell Mind uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
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By Kendra Cherry
Kendra Cherry, MS, is an author and educational consultant focused on helping students learn about psychology.